Books in March 2019, Part 1

It appears that I’ve been mostly writing about books these days. I reckon that it is better than not writing, and writing these little summaries helps me with my reading and information retention. Not to mention, it is also a great motivation for me to actually finish my books instead of leaving them unloved at 63% — 4 books currently suffer from this neglect, and it is not because they aren’t any good; it’s all me.

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The McKinsey Way
Ethan M. Rasiel

This is quite a dull book. If you are interested in how McKinsey consultants worked in the 90s, maybe this is worth a read.

I’m not sure how much of the work culture and practices still apply in present times (it’s been a full 2 decades), but I sure hope the hours have gotten better. I’m not against long working hours; I’m just not a fan of the glorification of the practice — if you need a badge of honour, let it be the outcome of your long hours. 

Anyway, if you aren’t sure how smart McKinsey consultants are, this book will die trying to convince you.

Understandably, the approaches mentioned here are better elaborated in newer and more current books publications. The Waterfall chart, though, is pretty cool. 

(Goodreads)


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Born A Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood
Trevor Noah

I didn’t know that I knew nothing about South Africa. After reading this book, I now know that I know next to nothing about South Africa (the little that I know now, I read about in this book). 

I kept hearing Trevor Noah’s voice as I read this; it was as if I was listening to this as an audiobook instead. 

I enjoyed this thoroughly, and along with Noah’s very exciting childhood, I learnt a little about the country and its history along the way. Especially interesting to read about was the use of language (intended or not) to sow / maintain discord between its people. 

(Off-topic here, but reading really does expand your understanding of the world. Then you get to decide what you want to feel about that.)

(Goodreads)


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Shane the Lone Ethnographer
Sally Campbell Galman

This wasn’t the book I thought it was. I’ve always wanted to conduct ethnography, but I was framing the activity as one for design. While ethnography has been used in design research, its roots are in anthropology, and this book is mostly written for a non-designer audience and more for academic researchers. Nonetheless, it is a solid introduction into ethnographic research and methods. 

This book is easy to read and I appreciated the brevity its comic-book format provides. Its chapters about data collection, analysis, and writing are relevant for anyone doing research! Be structured, be disciplined, and start analysing and writing early and consistently. Sounds like common sense, does it? Oh, just you wait.

(Goodreads